Superman year 0, part 4 – The Christian God

Superman and Jesus, Uncover the divine parallels: Superman, Jesus, and their shared journey of light, salvation, and resurrection.

“Even though you’ve been raised as a human being you are not one of them…They can be a great people Kal-El; they wish to be. They only lack the light to show the way. For this reason above all, their capacity for good, I have sent them you, my only son.” – Jor-El, Superman Returns 2006

 

Jor El and the infant Superman before being sent to Earth. – Man of Steel

 

 

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believed in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved…And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil…But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God.”John 3:16-17, 19, 21

 

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Content in a flash:

1. Superman and Jesus, The Christian God: Unveiling Christian Themes in Superman’s Story;

2. Superman and Jesus, The Archetype Of The Survivor: Superman’s origin, akin to Christian traditions, reflects themes of divine protection and great destiny;

3. Superman and Jesus – Sons Of The Gods: Superman’s earthly parents, Jonathan and Martha, echo the biblical figures of Mary and Joseph;

4. Redemption And Salvation: The light. – Superman and Jesus: Shared missions, resurrections, and symbolic parallels;

5. Jor-El, Light Of The World;

6. Lois Lane: Symbolism Unveiled: “Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction”;

 

1. Superman and Jesus, The Christian God

Apparently it’s no secret that the Christ myth has been interwoven with the story of Superman. Even beyond the comics’ portrayal, there’s discussion about how the creators intentionally incorporated Christian themes into many superman movies, especially in Man of Steel. This is nothing to roll the eyes at.

The number of similarities between the fictional character of Superman and the Jew historical character of Jesus Christ is astonishing. And yes, we say “the Jew historical character of Jesus” because – In times like these, clarity is essential – even if Jesus “founded” Christianity (did he?) he was not Christian. He was actually a Palestinian Jew.

As we’ll shortly see, the deliberate inclusion of Christian themes in Superman’s narrative finds powerful expression with many hidden elements and archetypes woven into its story; to grasp a sense of this, consider the scene in ‘Man of Steel’ where Superman assumes a full-frontal crucifixion pose following his father’s words, “You can save them all.”

 

Superman and Jesus Christ:

“You can save them all.”

 

 

2. Superman and Jesus: The Archetype Of The Survivor

In the previous article, we discussed how the finding of Superman inside a, escape-rocket echoes the way Moses was found in a basket and how this archetype, that of important figures being saved or hidden as infants, represents a common theme of divine protection and extraordinary destiny in many ancient religious tales.

Now, this narrative persists in the Christian tradition too. Just as Superman was sent away from Krypton in a small spacecraft to escape its destruction, similarly, Joseph and Mary fled with the infant Jesus to Egypt to protect him from King Herod’s order to kill all male infants in Bethlehem.

 

3. Superman and Jesus – Sons Of The Gods

Superman’s earthly parents, Jonathan and Martha, echo the biblical figures of Mary and Joseph. Interestingly, Martha was originally named Mary just like the Virgin Mary, while Jonathan its a Hebrew name that means “gift of God.”

Similar to the story of Joseph and Mary, Jonathan and Martha also faced childlessness until they were bestowed with a child as a gift.

This archetype, that of important figures being born following “divine” intervention is a common motif in ancient religious traditions as well. In Christian tradition, this theme is evident in the story of Elizabeth and Zechariah, who became parents to John the Baptist through divine intervention.
Similarly, Joseph and Mary, parents of Jesus Christ, unexpectedly received the gift of a child after the divine intervention of the archangel Gabriel.

 

4.Superman and JesusRedemption and Salvation: The light.

As we can deduce from the quote at the incipit of this article, Superman and Jesus share two elements straight from the start: extra terrestrial origins and mission.

Superman is coming from Krypton and Jesus from “Heaven” which means he could come from anywhere but Earth.

Both of them were sent by their fathers—Jor-El for Superman and God for Jesus—as their only sons to illuminate humanity’s path. Superman, much like Jesus, embodies values such as truth, justice, compassion, and selflessness, mirroring the fundamental principles advocated by Christianity.

Salvation and Redemption are actually key themes that threads through the entire Superman mythology, portraying Superman as a messianic figure in every respect sent to Earth to rescue humanity, —a parallel to Jesus’ role as a savior in Christianity.

In both narratives there’s a period of “hidden” years. Superman has his upbringing in Smallville, concealing his true identity, similar to the “lost years” of Jesus not covered in biblical accounts.

Both of them started their personal undertaking of their mission at the same age: 30 years old and Just before turning 30, they both undertook a journey to a remote destination: Superman traveled to the arctic wilderness to enter in contact with his father’s spirit, which mirrors Christ’s journey into the desert.

Superman and Jesus Christ

Superman travels to the arctic wilderness

Superman and Jesus Christ

Christ’s journey into the desert.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, they both died and resurrected.

Jesus died on the cross by the hand of the Romans and resurrected after 3 days. Superman gets killed once by one villain, Doomsday. This story is depicted on the comic book #75 published in 1992 called Doomsday, first part of three of The Death of Superman. He resurrects within a few episodes in number #82 in “Superman back for good”.

Serie: Superman and Jesus Christ

Comic book #75 published in 1992 called Doomsday, first part of three of The Death of Superman.

Superman and Jesus Christ

Jesus Resurrection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The intriguing parallels between Superman and Jesus Christ in their journey of light, salvation, and resurrection offer a profound lens through which to view this iconic myth.

Why do these striking connections persist, weaving threads between Superman and the central figure of Christianity?

5. Jor-El, Light Of The World

Jor-El, biological father of Superman, is a Kryptonian scientist and an influential member of Krypton’s council.

As we saw in the previous article, his profile evokes Mesopotamian mythology, particularly the god Enki, who also was a “scientist” who saved humanity. Aside from this, we once again encounter the use of “El” which is a clear reference to the biblical Elohim.

Now, we already know what ‘El’ means — “the mighty,” “the divine”— while “Jor” from the Hebrew word ‘or’ (אוֹר), means light.

So, ultimately Jor-EL would mean ‘The god of light or light of God’.

For time constraints, we are unable at the moment to delve into how the concept of light is indeed interwoven among sacred and mythological texts worldwide. However, what immediately comes to mind is perhaps the most obvious parallel: who is THE light? In Christian tradition Jesus is the light.

“I Am the Light of the World” – Jesus, John 8:12

6. Lois Lane: Symbolism Unveiled

When we examine the names of Superman mythology, interesting correspondences emerge. We’ve chosen to address Lois Lane separately in this section due to its apparent meaning intertwined with Christian tradition.

Lois Lane is an enterprising and independent journalist, often involved in investigative stories for the Daily Planet, and she is the primary love interest of Superman/Clark Kent.

Now, the name “Lois” is derived from the Greek “Λωΐς” (Loïs), which itself comes from “Ελεοίς” (Eleoïs), which means “better” or “more desirable.”

“Lane,” on the other hand, is derived from the old English word “lanu” or “lane,” signifying a narrow path or road, typically bordered by hedges.

Lois Lane is therefore a clear reference to the straight path, the narrow (Lane) – yet more desirable (Lois)- path, leading to life, in contrast to the broad and comfortable path leading to destruction. A clear reference to the Gospel parable of St. Matthew:

Matthew 7:13-14:

13 “Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it. 14 But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it.”

 

 

“I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” – John 8:12

 

 

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